Hearing Aid Compatibility

Cellular One…One Company for Compatibility.

Cellular One is commited to providing a selection of compatible phones for customers with hearing impairments. Cellular One complies with the hearing aid compatibility rules of the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), designed to make mobile phones more accessible to persons with disabilities. The FCC has created a rating system to help consumers with hearing disabilities find a phone that will work with their hearing aids.

M-Ratings:

The “M” stands for microphone; phones with M-ratings have been tested and rated for acoustic coupling purposes. Phones rated M3 or M4 meet FCC requirements and are likely to generate less interference to hearing devices set in microphone mode than phones that are not labeled. The higher the “M” rating, the more likely you will be able to use the phone with your hearing aid in microphone mode. The “M” rating is “better” or higher of the two ratings.

T-Ratings:

The “T” stands for telecoil; T-rated phones have been tested and rated for inductive coupling purposes. A telecoil is a small device built into some hearing aids for use with telephones as well as assistive listening devices. Phones rated T3 or T4 meet FCC requirements and are likely to generate less interference to hearing devices set in telecoil mode than phones that are not labeled. The higher the “T” rating, the less interference a handset will cause. When some mobile phones are used near some hearing devices (hearing aids and cochlear implants), users may detect noise from interference. Interference varies depending upon the hearing device and the phone. The wireless telephone industry has developed ratings to assist hearing device users in finding phones that may be compatible with their hearing devices. not all phones have been rated. Ratings are shown on a phone box or label. The ratings are not guarantees. Results will vary depending on the hearing device and individual hearing loss. if your hearing device happens to be vulnerable to interference, you may not be able to use a rated phone successfully. Trying out the phone with your hearing device is the best way to evaluate it for your personal needs. Hearing devices may also be measured for immunity to this type of interference. Your hearing device manufacturer or hearing health professional may help you find results for your hearing device. The more immune your hearing aid is, the less likely you will be to experience interference noise from mobile phones.

Compatible Phones (Updated December 2021)

These phones have been tested and rated for use with hearing aids for some of the wireless technologies that they use. However, there may be some newer wireless technologies used in these phones that have not been tested yet for use with hearing aids. It is important to try the different features of these phones thoroughly and in different locations, using your hearing aid or cochlear implant, to determine if you hear any interfering noise. Consult Cellular One or the manufacturer of the phone for information on hearing aid compatibility. if you have questions about return or exchange policies, visit the store where you purchased your Cellular One phone. Additional phones may be available through special ordering. Please contact Cellular One for more information.
Alcatel GF3 M4/T4
Apple iPhone 11 M3/T4
Apple iPhone SE (2020) M3/T4
Apple iPhone 11 Pro M3/T4
Apple iPhone 11 Pro Max M3/T4
Motorola Moto E7 M3/T4
NUU F4L
M4/T4
Samsung Galaxy Note 20
M3/T3
Samsung Galaxy Note 20 Ultra
M3/T3
Samsung Galaxy S8
M4/T3
Samsung Galaxy S9
M4/T3
Samsung Galaxy S20
M4/T3
Samsung Galaxy S20 Plus
M4/T3
Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra
M4/T3

Minimize Audible Interference

  • Use microphone settings on your hearing aid instead of the T-coil (telecoil) settings.
  • Find the point of least interference by moving the phone around.
  • Use the phone as far away from the hearing aid as possible.
  • Refer to the phone user guide to minimize the time interval on the phone’s Display and Keypad backlight settings.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

    • How do I check for hearing aid compatibility on wireless phones?
      • Handset units contain a label affixed to the units packaging indicating the M-rating of the phone, and an owner’s manual addendum is included in the packaging that discusses the rating system.
    • What is an “M” rating?
      • The “M” stands for microphone so the consumer will know the phone has been tested and rated for acoustic coupling purposes. Phones rated M3 or M4 meet FCC requirements and are likely to generate less interference to hearing devices set in microphone mode than phones that are not labeled. The higher the “M” rating, the less interference the handset will cause.
    • What is a “T” rating?
      • The “T” stands for telecoil so the consumer will know the phone has been tested and rated for inductive coupling purposes. The telecoil is a small device that is built into some hearing aids for use with the telephone as well as assistive listening devices. Phones rated T3 or T4 meet FCC requirements and are likely to generate less interference to hearing devices set in telecoil mode than phones that are not labeled. The higher the “T” rating, the less interference the handset will cause.
    • Does it matter what kind/TYPE of hearing aid I have?
      • Some hearing devices work better than others because of interference noise created by a digital wireless phone. Ask your Hearing Aid Healthcare Professional if your hearing aid has EMI “shielding” or if the circuitry design is more immune to interference. in general, digital hearing aids have less interference than analog hearing aids.
    • Can I return a phone that doesn’t work with my hearing aid?
      • We have a flexible return policy for HAC-compliant phones. You can cancel the service agreement and return the phone within 30 days of purchase without incurring any penalty or early termination charge if you are not satisfied with the handset’s performance with your hearing aid.
    • How can I find out if my hearing aid will work with a particular phone before trying out that phone?
      • You will need to know the “M” ratings of both the phone and your hearing aid. add the ratings for both the phone and your hearing aid together to determine probable usability (Hearing Aid: M2 + Phone: M3 = Combined rating of 5). This will let you know if your hearing aid is likely to work with a particular phone.
        • Combined rating of 6 is best.
        • Combined rating of 5 is better.
        • Combined rating of 4 is good.
Cellular One has live units in all of our retail stores where customers can test the phone’s compatibility with their hearing aid *before* they buy.
  • What questions should I ask my Hearing Aid Healthcare Professional?
    • Does your hearing aid have “cell phone shielding”?
    • What is the “M” (microphone) rating of your hearing aid?
    • Is the circuitry design of your hearing aid more immune to interference?

Further Information